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Trissler: DigLit - Research Unit: Intellectual Property Rights

Copyright, Fair Use AND Plagiarism

CHECK WHO OWNS IT!      GET PERMISSION TO USE IT!     GIVE CREDIT TO THE CREATOR!     BUY IT (if necessary)!    

USE  IT RESPONSIBLY!

DEFINITIONS:

Intellectual Freedom: The right of all individuals to seek out & receive information on any subject and representing multiple points of view (from: the American Library Association)

Censorship: Controlling or limiting the freedom to investigate, access, or express concepts, and/or creative works (from: ACLU: American Civil Liberties Union)

Copyright = "Legal ownership of a work or symbol" (from: Our Digital World)

USPTO.gov: United States Patent & Trademark Office (from :usa.gov)

Patent - A government grant to an inventor, his heirs or assigns, for a stated period of time conferring exclusive right to make, use, license or vend an invention, process etc. (from: The Random House Dictionary of the English Language)

Trademark - Something (such as a word) that identifies a particular company's product and cannot be used by another company without permission; a quality or way of behaving, speaking etc., that is very typical of a particular group or organization (from: Merriam Webster's Online Dictionary)

Attribution- recognizing/identifying the original creator (Common Sense Media)

Plagiarize (plagiarism) = "To steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own; use (another 's production) without crediting the source; to commit literary theft; present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source." (from: Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed.)

Fair Use - conditions under which copyrighted materials can be used without the permission of the copyright holder (Digital Literacy Database).

The four (4) main factors that affect a legal "Fair Use" decision in court are if the material is:

1) non-profit educational use and/or editorials, humor/commentary, news reporting with an educational focus 

2)  factual or creative (creative works are more seriously considered as important to be protected legally and whether the work was already published or not yet published

3) a limited amount of the original work is used - depends on the work's format (See below) 

4) **effect of use on market for or value of work **  - would the original creator lose $ (most powerful factor for court decisions - very open!

- from:  Copyright for Schools. 2010).

Public Domain - materials that are not covered by copyright ( from: Digital Literacy Database)

Commercial Use - a use in connection with a business, usually for profit (Commonsense Media)

Creative Commons -  A Nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal licenses (from: CC Website)

"FAIR USE FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES" - How Much of an Original Media Work Can I Use?

FromThe University of Washington's Copyright Connection, 2013

4.2.1 Motion Media

Up to 10% or 3 minutes, whichever is less, in the aggregate of a copyrighted motion media work may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines.

4.2.2 Text Material

Up to 10% or 1000 words, whichever is less, in the aggregate of a copyrighted work consisting of text material may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines. An entire poem of less than 250 words may be used, but no more than three poems by one poet, or five poems by different poets from any anthology may be used. For poems of greater length, 250 words may be used but no more than three excerpts by a poet, or five excerpts by different poets from a single anthology may be used.

4.2.3 Music, Lyrics, and Music Video

Up to 10%, but in no event more than 30 seconds, of the music and lyrics from an individual musical work (or in the aggregate of extracts from an individual work), whether the musical work is embodied in copies, or audio or audiovisual works, may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as a part of a multimedia project created under Section 2. Any alterations to a musical work shall not change the basic melody or the fundamental character of the work.

4.2.4 Illustrations and Photographs

The reproduction or incorporation of photographs and illustrations is more difficult to define with regard to fair use because fair use usually precludes the use of an entire work. Under these guidelines a photograph or illustration may be used in its entirety but no more than 5 images by an artist or photographer may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2. When using photographs and illustrations from a published collective work, not more than 10% or 15 images, whichever is less, may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2.

4.2.5 Numerical Data Sets

Up to 10% or 2500 fields or cell entries, whichever is less, from a copyrighted database or data table may be reproduced or otherwise incorporated as part of an educational multimedia project created under Section 2 of these guidelines. A field entry is defined as a specific item of information, such as a name or Social Security number, in a record of a database file. A cell entry is defined as the intersection where a row and a column meet on a spreadsheet.

Creative Commons Licenses

WHERE CAN I FIND "Copyright Free" / Public Domain Resources ???

VIDEOS : Copyright: Dos and Don'ts ; Watch and write down two observations to share!

After watching each of the videos, somplete one  (1) of the following sentence stems and share with your partner!

I learned . . . .

I am beginning to wonder , , , ,

I was surprised that , , , ,

I rediscovered , , , ,

I want to know more about . . .. 

60 Second Warning

"One Minute More" by Capital Cities/Sweda Music

Multimedia Projects: Captions & Citations

Our Very Own: Leading the Way !

"Treat your readers as intelligent . . ."  Randy Krum  [President of InfoNewt Data Visualization]

Student Creativity, Synthesis of Data, Original Works & Copyright Licensing of their Original Works: LSA Student Google Slides/Video:

"Creative +" by Elsie McLaughlin & Andrew Jalowayski

IN-TEXT CITATIONS FOR PAPERS AND REPORTS Basic MLA 8 Format

When to use (In-text) Parenthetical Citations in Your Paper

In your paper, place an in-text citation at the end of each sentence

(just before the final period for the sentence) when you:

 

1) Directly Quote a statement from an authority, person interviewed on topic or 1-2 sentences from a source

2) Summarize an author's ideas (read about the main concepts of a topic and put them in your own words);

3) Paraphrase information from a source (reState facts, statistics, names, dates in your own original words and sentence)

IMPORTANT: 1st - Correct your Works Cited List first and Create In-Text Citations from it

IMPORTANT:  Last step - Make certain that you have a full citation in Works Cited for every In-Text Source used in your paper/project

 

For parenthetical citations of PRINT materials/sources (with page numbers) :

[direct quote- one author] "The world can no longer close it's eyes to the problem of global warming" (Tanaka 12).

 

[summary]  It is possible that the slow but steady rise in the earth's temperatures could cause wide-spread droughts, ferocious storms and major flooding as the sea level rises (Behr 33).

 

[paraphrase - electronic- database-  source without author]

In 1990, countries participating in the U.N. Kyoto Protocol agreed to express future measurements of greenhouse gas emissions against the baseline that existed in that year, and by 2015 it was found that globally, greenhouse gas emissions had increased by 37% ("Climate").

 

[paraphrase - electronic source with two (2) authors]

In 2017, the Trump administration withdrew support for the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement, however, this decision may end up actually reinforcing the multinational commitment among developing countries (Pickering and McGee).

 

PARAPHRASE WHENEVER YOU CAN!!!   PUT IT IN YOUR OWN WORDS!!!

 

Sample Paragraph with In-Text Citations

Scientists, politicians, religious leaders and everyday people all have their opinion on the issue of "global warming" and how serious it is at this point in the earth's history. Cooperative efforts are required to face our planet's call.  Polar ice fields have been melting over the past few generations  and most everyone has witnessed images of animals and peoples from the very high and low latitudes being displaced as a result. "The world can no longer close its eys to the problem of global warming" (Tanaka and Morse 12).  Gathering hard data on the issue has been a challenge, but finally in 1990, countries participating in the U.N. Kyoto Protocol agreed to express future measurements of greenhouse gas emissions against the baseline that existed in that year, and by 2015 it was found that globally, greenhouse gas emissions had increased by 37% ("Climate"). If emissions continue to increase, the temperature of the earth and its vast oceans could possibly rise to the point where ferocious storms, flooding, and droughts would be the new reality (Behr 33).  In 2017, the Trump administration withdrew support for the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement, however, this decision may end up actually reinforcing the multinational commitment among developing countries (Pickering and McGee).

Works Cited

Behr, Peter. "In the Dark." Environmental Forum, vol. 34, no. 2, Mar/Apr2017, pp. 32-37.

      EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=8gh&AN=121491239.

"Climate Change: Annual Greenhouse Gas Index." Climate.gov, NOAA.

      9 June 2016, www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-change.

Pickering, Jonathan and Jeffrey McGee. "The Impact of the U.S. Retreating from the Paris

     Agreement:Kyoto Revisited?" Climate Policy, volume 18 2018,  issue 7, Taylor and

     Francis Online, 17 Dec. 2017, https://visual.ly/community/infographic/other/how.

Tanaka, Shelley.  Climate Change. Groundwood, 2006. p.12.

 

Sample Infographic with Captions!

 

Created by Diana Marcaccio '22 and Tori Caroa 22

 

CAPTIONS: Attribution for Media Projects

Book:  Author's Last Name, year  published

Newspaper Articletitle of Newspaper, date published

Database Article: Name of Journal, Magazine, Reference work, year published

Webarticle: Sponsoring Organization, year published